OURs

our abortions.png
Ours2.jpeg
Ours3.jpeg

Title

OURs

Creator

Alicia Eggert

Alicia Eggert (b. 1981) is an interdisciplinary artist whose work gives material form to language and time, the powerful but invisible forces that shape our perception of reality. She derives her inspiration from physics and philosophy, and work often co-opts the methods and materials associated with commercial signage to communicate messages that inspire reflection and wonder. She has made flashing neon signs that illuminate the way light travels across spacetime, billboards that allow Forever to appear and disappear in the fog, and signs that reveal the relationship between reality and possibility. These sculptures have been installed on rooftops in Russia, on bridges in Amsterdam, and on uninhabited islands in Maine, beckoning people to ponder their place in the world and the role they play in it.

Alicia's work has been exhibited at notable institutions nationally and internationally, including the Renwick Gallery at the Smithsonian American Art Museum, the CAFA Art Museum in Beijing, the Triennale Design Museum in Milan, the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the Everson Museum of Art, the Corning Museum of Glass, the Albuquerque Museum of Art and History, the Telfair Museums, and many more. Recent solo exhibitions have been held at Liliana Bloch Gallery (Dallas, TX), Artspace (Raleigh, NC), and Galeria Fernando Santos (Porto, Portugal). Alicia is the recipient of numerous honors and awards, including a TED Fellowship, a Long Now Foundation Fellowship, a Washington Award from the S&R Foundation, a Direct Artist Grant from the Harpo Foundation, an Artist Microgrant from the Nasher Sculpture Center, and an Individual Artist Fellowship from the Maine Arts Commission. She has been an artist in residence at Google Tilt Brush, Sculpture Space, True/False Film Festival, and the Tides Institute and Museum of Art. In 2020, she was added to the Fulbright Specialist Roster by the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs.

Eggert’s work is in the collection of the Renwick Gallery of the Smithsonian American Art Museum, New Holland Island (St. Petersburg, Russia), the Light Art Collection (Amsterdam, Netherlands), the City of Houston’s Civic Art Program, S&R Foundation, IBM, Capital One, HALL Arts Hotel, and more. She is currently an Associate Professor of Studio Art at the University of North Texas. She is represented by Galeria Fernando Santos in Porto, Portugal, and Liliana Bloch Gallery in Dallas.

Coverage

Supreme Court of the United States, Washington, D.C., US.

Date

January 22, 2020

Date Created

2022

Contributor

Photographer: Christopher Thomas

Description

OURs is an installation made of LED neon, aluminum, paint, acrylic. Dimensions are: 76” x 120” x 40”. It was produced in partnership with Planned Parenthood Federation of America, and unveiled on January 22, 2022. These images are from the first installation of the sculpture at the Supreme Court of the United States.

Abstract

Artist Statement:

This flashing neon sign was made in collaboration with Planned Parenthood to illuminate the importance of abortion access at a critical time in history. It cycles endlessly through the statements “OUR BODIES,” “OUR FUTURES,” and “OUR ABORTIONS.” The constant interchangeability of those three statements serves to highlight their inseparability — how a person’s control over their own body determines how much control they have over their future, and how access to abortions is an essential part of that control. Designed to be a mobile sign, the sculpture was first displayed at the Supreme Court of the United States before it began traveling across the country to shine a light on Americans’ rights to make decisions about our bodies, our futures, our abortions.

Source

IG: @aplaceintheuniverse

http://aliciaeggert.com

https://www.plannedparenthood.org/about-us/newsroom/press-releases/planned-parenthood-unveils-ours-a-traveling-light-installation-that-illuminates-the-fight-for-abortion-rights

Identifier

M2M_0020

Geolocation